Judith Varlet of Connecticut

Judith Varlet of Connecticut

Judith Varlet (or Varleth) was the daughter of a successful Dutch textiles-merchant, whose family decided to settle in America. Of course, this woman's life was full of hardships the moment they set foot on this new land. Her sister Sarah was abducted by natives of the land, which caused a lot of trauma in her family. However, things got real bad for Judith and her kin when she was accused of witchcraft. In the year 1662 she was living with her parents when she was accused of "disturbing a young girl" -- whatever that means. Judith was convicted of witchcraft, but she was rescued in the 11th hour by way of a governor pardon. The then-governor of Connecticut then arranged for Judith to marry. Once she was wed, she and her husband moved to New York, where they raised at least one child.

Genealogy of Judith Varlet

Judith Varlet married Nicholas Bayard. The two produced a son named Samuel Bayard. Samuel Bayard fathered at least 11 children. Many of his children either did not have children of their own, or they are lost to history. However his daughter Gertruyd married and had multiple children: William Kemble, Samuel Kemble, Richard Kemble, Margaret (Kemble) Gage, Peter Kemble, Stephen Kemble and Judith (Kemble) McCall. This generation of Varlet descendants resided in Hackensack, New Jersey. The many children of Gertruyd also produced numerous offspring -- including Judith's namesake -- her great-granddaughter Judith McCall, who had the following children: George McCall, Mary Charlotte (McCall) Cadwalader, Peter McCall, Archibald McCall, George McCall, Samuel McCall, Anne (McCall) Read, Peter McCall, Margaret McCall, Samuel McCall, Harriet McCall, Gertrude McCall, Jasper McCall, Richard McCall, Catharine McCall, William McCall, Robert McCall and Henry McCall.

As you can see, the Judith Varlet family tree is incredibly prolific, with many of her descendants producing large families. With this knowledge in mind, it is highly likely that Judith has thousands of living descendants today.